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BrainWaves


Sep 28, 2017

This week on BrainWaves, we go back in time to explore human's oldest neurosurgical procedure. So carve out some time in your day to learn about the ancient technique of craniotomy.

Produced by James E. Siegler. Music by Chris Zabriskie, Kai Engel, Kevin McLeod, The Philadelphia Orchestra, and Sergey Cheremisinov. Voiceover by John Burnett. BrainWaves' podcasts and online content are intended for medical education only and should not be used for routine clinical practice. Please do NOT drill into anyone's head without their full and informed consent.

REFERENCES

  1. Sperati G. Craniotomy through the ages. Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital. 2007;27:151-6.
  2. Verano JW and Finger S. Chapter 1: ancient trepanation. Handbook of clinical neurology. 2010;95:3-14.
  3. Missios S. Hippocrates, Galen, and the uses of trepanation in the ancient classical world. Neurosurgical focus. 2007;23:E11.
  4. Newman WC, Chivukula S and Grandhi R. From Mystics to Modern Times: A History of Craniotomy & Religion. World Neurosurg. 2016;92:148-50.
  5. Clower WT and Finger S. Discovering trepanation: the contribution of Paul Broca. Neurosurgery. 2001;49:1417-25; discussion 1425-6.
  6. Assina R, Sarris CE and Mammis A. The history of craniotomy for headache treatment. Neurosurgical focus. 2014;36:E9.
  7. Faria MA, Jr. Violence, mental illness, and the brain - A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 1 - From trephination to lobotomy. Surg Neurol Int. 2013;4:49.
  8. Tsermoulas G, Aidonis A and Flint G. The skull of Chios: trepanation in Hippocratic medicine. Journal of neurosurgery. 2014;121:328-32.